Monday, November 15, 2010

Higher Education

I’m gonna curb stomp whichever one of you dweebs recommend I watch the John Singleton movie Higher Learning.  I’ve enjoyed Singleton’s work both before and since, but the clichés in this one, from the Midwestern white girl who clutches her purse tighter when she shares an elevator with a black student, to the preppy college kids turning their campus into South-Central LA to celebrate the start of the semester, were probably absurd back in 1995.  Today, they made me abandon the movie five minutes in, cursing the 3-day Netflix turnaround.

I’ll give you this though:  Kristy Swanson was a total babe back in the 1990s.  It’s tragic the way actresses try to use plastic surgery to recover their fading bloom when I can’t think of a single instance in which this was done successfully.

4 comments:

Dexter said...

"It’s tragic the way actresses try to use plastic surgery to recover their fading bloom when I can’t think of a single instance in which this was done successfully."

The alternative to a graceless effort to remain in the limelight is gracefully fading into obscurity, and the latter is unthinkable to Hollywood types. Of course, they always choose the graceless path and get the obscurity anyway, too bad.

I can't believe Buffy was almost 20 years ago! Just had another "man I feel old now" moment...

trumwill said...

When it's done successfully, you don't know it was done.

Φ said...

Trumwill: well, I suppose if an actress suddenly showed up looking better than her age-of-record would predict, we would know that way. But I can't think of this ever happening.

Dexter: Sally Fields and Julie Andrews, for instance, gracefully transitioned to playing mom and grandma roles. Audrey Hepburn found work in charitable fundraising. Other actresses in the pre-plastic surgery era did indeed disappear into their Manhattan penthouses, but that's not their only graceful option.

trumwill said...

I don't know. Seems to me a lot of actresses don't look their age. Never know whether to attribute it to genetics, makeup, or plastic surgery. I suspect it's quite often the last and I just don't know it.