Thursday, March 29, 2012

AFGHANS: QURAN-BURNING SOLDIERS TO FACE TRIAL [in Afghan courts]

So says Worldnet Daily.

U.S officials were unwilling to state emphatically that the soldiers would not be turned over to the Afghan legal system for burning the Qurans.

William Speakes, a spokesman for the Pentagon said, “It would be premature to speculate at any potential outcomes. Any disciplinary action if deemed warranted will be taken by U.S. authorities after a thorough review of the facts pursuant to all U.S. military law and regulations and in accordance with due process. We have made no commitments beyond that.”

Is there anything the Obama administration does that cannot be understood by assuming that it hates America?

4 comments:

Professor Hale said...

There is no way US troops will be handed over for koran burning. We have a status of forces agreement that exempts US soldiers from local law enforcement actions of any kind. The soldiers were following orders and the orders were not explicitly illegal. Burning Korans is not forbidden by any US law or military policy.

handing them over to the Afghans for a certain death penalty would be such a severe breach of faith, especially since they spirited away the guy who killed women and children, that I cannot even imagine the disruptions it would cause.

At a minimum, I am guessing that other US soldeirs would refuse to obey the orders to hand them over.

Elusive Wapiti said...

Supposedly US troops are immune from Afghan prosecution.

Personally, I would rather have had our leadership just come out with it and said that the Korans were purposefully destroyed because they were defaced by the prisoners who were handling them.

No apologies, just the facts. No appearing weak. No appeasing our Islamist enemies.

It's not like Karzai is playing nice anyways...so no sense in sucking up to him or his sychophants. We would do better to tell the truth and look strong doing it.

Elusive Wapiti said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Dr. Φ said...

I agree that the likelihood of our soldiers standing "trial" in Afghan courts is vanishingly small. But the mincing answers to the direct question is bad enough.