Monday, January 04, 2010

Single Parent Subsidies

It seems that Georgia Tech has a scholarship called “Individuals Making Positive Achievements in the Community at Tech Single Parent Scholarship” (IMPACT):

$4,000 Scholarship to a Single Parent who is successfully balancing Georgia Tech classes and parenting.

No word yet on a scholarship for the young lady who is successfully balancing Georgia Tech classes and keeping her knickers on!

UPDATE:  I’ll burnish my old-fogey credentials by suggesting a connection between IMPACT and the fact that 33/43 of Georgia Tech’s dormitories residence halls are now co-ed.

9 comments:

Elusive Wapiti said...

An intemperate thought here: is there a link between this scholarship and minority enrollment at GT?

Seems to me that this scholarship is just another backdoor way to boost NAM numbers at GT.

Professor Hale said...

I am guessing the "successful parenting" part of the balance will not be measured in any meaningful way.

Kirt33 said...

Not that I disagree with this sort of sentiment:

No word yet on a scholarship for the young lady who is successfully balancing Georgia Tech classes and keeping her knickers on!

But, I will say this: one of the things I have realized as a passionate opponent of abortion is that if we truly want to reduce abortion (and not merely sound self-righteous), it's crucial to provide young women with support for options that they see as good alternatives.

Justin said...

Yeah, how about the scholarship for the parent who is successfully balancing classes and marriage?

The big question is, who is paying for the scholarship?

Kirt33: it is not the job of social conservatives to be the janitors for the liberal sexual revolution. Girls are already responding to what they see as good alternatives: namely guaranteed welfare and child support payments.

Φ said...

Elusive Wapiti: good question. If so, it counts as progress of sorts; once upon a time, Georgia Tech wouldn't have needed to disguise its affirmative action programs as an AFDC redux.

Prof Hale: Good point. Nothing about metrics in the link.

Kirt: While I respect that view, I also believe that at some threshold level, we ought not submit to extortion of the "gimme-stuff-or-I'll-abort" variety. I'm pretty sure this program meets that threshold.

Φ said...

Justin:

"Janitors for the liberal sexual revolution" - filed.

For what it's worth, it sounded like non-appropriated funds paid for the program.

I was wondering the same thing about married students. Kind of like all those internet ads about how "Obama Wants Single Mothers to Return to School

trumwill said...

So... giving the sinning woman some stuff in exchange for a human life is a bad trade-off?

The main problem I see with taking the bribery tact, if we view it that way, is that it creates moral hazard. It encourages them to get pregnant and all that. That's fair enough.

However, a woman that is attending classes at Georgia Tech is less inclined to choose the "easy way out" (or see that as the easy way out) in comparison to some young woman of limited means and no career future. In other words, these are the people with some of the highest opportunity costs out there. Mitigating those costs doesn't pose nearly as much of a threat.

Professor Hale said...

However, a woman that is attending classes at Georgia Tech is less inclined to choose the "easy way out"

You have it exactly backwards. The college girls are at the same time sexually promiscuous (dare I say adventurous) and at the same time on a track to a degree program that will not be distracted by motherhood. This isn't like High School where attendence is manditory unless you get pregnant. The girls going to college want to graduate because they are all certain that the world needs them in the career track.

Ask any pharmacist in a college town about their "Plan B" sales every monday morning.

trumwill said...

Hale, I meant that they would not see having a baby as an easy way out. My language was shoddy at best. By "out" I meant "out of the house" or "out of childhood" or "out of having to actually work for a living."

I'm in agreement with you: they're likely to abort. That's why something like this may not be a bad idea. Particularly at a school like Georgia Tech which has women that are much more likely to be intelligent and are more likely to have a real future ahead of them.