Friday, October 23, 2009

I Love You, Man

I saw the movie I Love You, Man on DVD. I enjoyed the movie, but I don't really have much to say about it. I particularly identified with Paul Rudd's character. While never a "relationship guy" (because, duh, I would have had to have relationships), I empathized with his struggle to put on that kind of roughhousing jocularity that he sees among his male friends. (If you've seen the movie, you know what I'm talking about.) I've always played the "straight man", mainly because my attempts to do otherwise come out so badly.

One of the aspects of the male-female dichotomy that the movie exploits is about sex-talk. According to the movie, women talk among themselves about the intimate details of their sex lives, whereas guys don't much. Is this true? I mean, I believe the guy part, though it may be a generational thing: by the time I had anything to talk about (29) most other men that age had outgrown those kind of conversations. But do girls really talk about that kind of stuff with each other?

One more thing. The movie asks us to believe that Rashida Jones' character, who I assume is approximately the age of Rashida Jones (33) never heard of Rush. Really?

Nope. Not plausible.

Gimme some more.

Yeeeaaahhh!

YouTube rocks.

10 comments:

Justin said...

Rush just gets better with time, don't they? I like them more now than I did then.

Trumwill said...

Re: Rush... it's not as incredible as you might think. I only have the vaguest idea of who Rush is and were it not for the BBS, I probably wouldn't even have that.

That's a movie very high on my list of things to see, actually.

Φ said...

I only have the vaguest idea of who Rush is

Kids these days!

ironrailsironweights said...

My impression is that women talk about sex with their friends more than men do, but not as much as Sex and the City would lead one to believe.

Peter

Kirt33 said...

Phi, what it is up with your comment box? I can't copy, paste or use the 'home' or 'end' keys in it. It's making me give up on commenting sometimes.

Φ said...

Crap, so far it was just Trumwill. I don't know what's going on because I've never had any problem, but I will go back to the popup comment box to see if that helps.

DaveinHackensack said...

My girlfriend and I saw this movie in the theater with another couple. I liked it -- thought it was very funny. I especially liked Lou Ferrigno playing himself.

As for the sex talk, my girlfriend and my friend's wife both thought the movie's portrayal of it was unrealistic.

If you liked this movie, a couple of others worth checking out: Jason Segal's Forgetting Sarah Marshall -- that had some pretty funny parts in it. Also, The Ten, which starred Paul Rudd. That one's a compilation of stories based on the Ten Commandments. It's pretty funny too, particularly the scenes with Gretchen Mol in Mexico.

trumwill said...

I was disappointed by Forgetting Sarah Marshall. The R-Comedy genre fashion has really been interesting, though. I've seen The Hangover twice in recent weeks (being unemployed and having a dollar theater nearby is pretty cool). Funny People was fantastic.

DaveinHackensack said...

Forgetting Sarah Marshall was uneven, but some of the scenes with Russell Brand were worth it, IMO. Haven't seen the Hangover.

One thing worth saying about I Love You Man: if you go by the heuristic that a comedy is no funnier than the clips shown in its ads, you will be pleasantly surprised, I think. I found it to be a lot funnier than the scenes in the ads. Is that true of the Hangover as well, or was that Tyson scene the funniest thing in the movie?

trumwill said...

Props to Russell Brand. His character was awesome in that movie.

I never saw the Hangover trailer, so I'm not sure (the movie was recommended by a friend). Mike Tyson was pretty far from the funniest thing in the movie, though.

Speaking of previews, though, I noticed the last time I was at a theater that all of the previews looked really good. Most movies, though, are not that good. So I have to give a lot of credit to the preview editors.